Our bikes, part nine

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This is – in more ways than one – the most modern bike in our stable, a 1988 (egads! the future is here!) Bianchi Trofeo with a – wait for it – gruppo Campagnolo Veloce 10 velocità. Coming from downtube friction shifters, the brake-lever shifting on the modern “Campag” drivetrain is a revelation. The most obvious analogy would be going from a standard (manual) to flappy paddle gearbox in the automotive world, except even that comparison seems facile and imprecise, since manual automotive gearboxes don’t require such procedures as “trimming” shifts (edit: okay, depending on the presence or absence of synchros as well as the condition thereof, equally archaic practices such as double-declutching might be called for). We’re not saying we wouldn’t ever go back to downtube shifters – the satisfying mechanical ‘clunk’ of a C Record shifter has lodged its place firmly within our hearts – but we have also seen the future, and the future looks good.

And of course, we’ve always been big fans of the X4 Argentin-inspired black-and-Celeste contrasting paint scheme, so there’s that going for the bike as well.

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Specification:

  • 51cm seat tube (c-c)
  • 52cm top tube (c-c)
  • 77cm standover
  • Campagnolo Veloce 10 Speed 50/34 compact crankset

 

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